Introduced by the Academy of American Poets in 1996, National Poetry Month is celebrated each April in order to increase awareness of and appreciation for poetry. Schools, libraries, publishers, booksellers, and poets—from amateurs to experts—all join in the celebration of the literary form.

National Poetry Month

(Pixabay / andreas160758)

There are poems on limitless subjects. Some are even devoted to the art of carpentry and craftsmanship.At DIY-Plans, we’re particularly fond of the following shed-themed poems:

My Little Garden Shed

I love my little garden shed, it’s like a home from home,
I keep all sorts of treasure there and David is my Gnome.
It’s carpeted and curtained with electric routed in,
A two seat sofa, radio and cookies in a tin.
A bookshelf in the corner with some stuff I like to read,
History and poetry, and ‘How Does A Hedgehog Breed?’
It’s more than home from home to me, of that there is no doubt,
Been sleeping here about a week, my wife has kicked me out!

The poem is written by a stay-at-home father and former Royal Air Force member who goes by the pen name “Podders.”

Shed

I’ll tell it to the shed.
It sighed when I entered,
invited me to chat,
say what had happened

From my point of view.
I could smell it meant it –
years of creosote soaked
into timber, its limbs supple,

well-oiled.
I want to insulate it,
paint it green,
use it as a writing room.

The potting table will do.
I’ll clean the glass,
rub down the wood –
the broken chair has rustic charm.

At one end I’ll put a screen
to hide the mower
and the oversized tools inherited
from the last owner.

I move the rake, a garden sieve
and sit on his chair.
I’d tip back,
but the legs wobble

and I know they’ll break.
So we sit there,
the shed and me
and I wish I’d brought wine

to share. I’d put it
on the potting table,
maybe light candles,
cozy up to the compost

and say how lost I feel,
how utterly awful
the world is. Its old wood
understands.

Abegail Morley, who is considered to be one of the five promising British poets for 2017, penned “Shed.”